Ultrasound Articles

Preliminary Clinical Results with Precision Imaging Technology

Source: TOSHIBA Europe

Posted: 15.03.2010

Ultrasonography offers a wide range of highly sophisticated technological options, chief among them being sensitive vascularization methods such as power Doppler or ADF, contrast media, 3D techniques and elastography. However, B-mode imaging remains the indispensible mainstay of ultrasound diagnostics and imaging. In most cases, tissue structures can only be visulized and differentiated in B-mode.Read...

Clinical Applications of Advanced High Frequency Ultrasound Techniques

Source: Visions Journal

Posted: 4.03.2010

High frequency ultrasound techniques continue to improve with better resolution and exquisite Bmode imaging, particularly with improved compounding techniques as seen with the ApliPure+ product. Particular focus however has been paid to improving techniques for breast imaging and one novel idea is to be able to highlight microcalcifications within tissues.Read...

Microcalcification Detection in Breast Ultrasound A New Perspective?

Source: Visions Journal

Posted: 4.03.2010

The prime task of diagnostic breast ultrasound is the focused rapid assessment of new findings on palpation, particularly in young women with dense mammary tissue. Optimization of the devices for this modality has resulted in high-resolution breast ultrasound which over the last few years has led to marked improvements in image quality, detail recognition and spatial resolution of the sonographic image. Techniques such as Tissue Harmonic Imaging (THI) and Spatial/Frequency Compounding (FC) have made it possible to visualize even the smallest changes in tissue. Read...

Elastography A Safe Modality to Differentiate Breast Lesions with Ultrasound?

Source: Visions Journal

Posted: 4.03.2010

One important characteristic of tissue is its inherent elasticity which may be altered by pathophysiologic processes such as ageing, inflammation and malignant tumors. In this context elasticity is defined as the ratio of the tension (stress) needed to produce a relative change in length (strain) and describes how much pressure must be exerted on the tissue in order for it to undergo elastic deformation. In principle tissue elasticity can be derived from the stress and strain measured in the tissue structures. While strain can be computed easily based on the high frequency echo signals, stress cannot be determined directly from tissue measurements. Thus, compression must take place under standardized conditions.Read...